Author’s manifesto for 2021

I’ve been in commercial writing since 2017. I’ve come all the way from a freelancer to an owner of a design studio.

Here are 25 principles I’ve crafted over 5 years of my career. They’ll help you increase your value as a writer, and, therefore, your profit.

Editing

  1. Before you start writing a copy, think about how not to write one.
  2. Your text will not change the world. It’s just another text.
  3. Don’t play with the words, don’t move them around. It won’t make much of a difference.
  4. Don’t grind your copies to perfection. Publish fast, then polish. Perfect things exist only in your mind.
  5. Publish your post while it burns you from the inside and excites you.
  6. Hire a proofreader so that you wouldn’t have to argue with the client about spelling and punctuation.

Service

  1. Take responsibility for the result you provide, not for separate words, sentences, or a number of characters.
  2. Ask questions and listen to the client carefully. He has all the answers.
  3. Don’t be an asshole: don’t go missing and warn your clients when troubles arise.
  4. Don’t teach your client how to write texts, and don’t be stubborn like a ram.
  5. Don’t argue about your unique vision of writing and style. No one is interested in it. Solve the task and don’t try to show who’s the boss here.
  6. Leave emotions behind when you enter a Zoom meeting. Reschedule if you are off-balance.
  7. Don’t grovel and don’t settle for bad decisions. Defend your working routine, processes and principles.

Money

  1. Always work on a contract and take an advance payment.
  2. There is no such thing as an average price. Only a fair price. A fair price is the one that suits you and your client.
  3. It’s not easy to make a living on writing. To make more, sell the service, not the text or the number of characters.
  4. Develop skills in related areas: layout, management, design, code, typography, illustration, negotiation, law.
  5. Never work on urgent tasks. You won’t make much money, but you’re guaranteed to eat some shit and be a scapegoat in the end.
  6. Work only on the projects you wouldn’t be ashamed to put in your portfolio.
  7. Don’t get into a project with a bad context, especially out of need. You won’t be happy with the money made there.

Strength

  1. Remember that you’re great. You make a living using your head. Most people never dare to do it.
  2. When you don’t see a way out, go back to the initial brief and the task your client brought in. Usually, you’ll find an answer or a hint there.
  3. See all projects through to completion. In hard times remind yourself why you got into this project and keep the goal in mind like a lighthouse in the storm.
  4. Take care of your health: sleep at night, exercise, eat well. Make 10,000 steps a day, eat fruit, vegetables, and greens, drink more water and less coffee.
  5. Be honest and frank with yourself. All problems begin with a lie.

P. S. This year I’m going to talk to the authors, writers, and editors, even more, to fill the manifesto with new principles that I consider crucial and useful. I hope that in five years, when the fifth version of the manifesto comes out, we’ll be able to trace how the profession of the writer has changed.

Hegarty on creativity: There are no rules

In London I bought a book by John Hegarty, an iconic British PR-manager and advertiser. The book has only 125 pages, but it’s the most captivating piece on creative thinking I’ve ever read. I ate it during my three hour flight to Moscow, and funny but literally can eat this book, 'cause it’s printed without ink.

Hegarty breaks all templates and familiar patterns that stuck in our heads, and reminds about simple truths we know, but we are too afraid to follow.

The book is written in a modern and clear language. Anyone with an intermediate level of English can easily read and understand everything Hegarty says. Here’s one of the feature quotes from the book:

Screw the rules, go hard.

Read more

What’s all the fuss about?

Hey!

My name is Evgeny. I’m an editor, writer and art director. I run a small design studio and write copies for brands. Beside that I have a few side projects of my own as this blog and my weekly newsletter about writing.

That’s me in Rize, Turkey

I have a Russian origin, so don’t freak out 'cause of my name. The English version of it is Eugene, and I hate it. So, when you contact me never refer to me like that, use the original version of the name. Or at least the Spanish one—Eugenio.

I grew up in Tobolsk, a small Siberian town and then moved to Tyumen, just 228 km to the south. But the weather is pretty much the same here. We have cold and snowy winters, and goddamn hot summers. Sometimes they’re so hot you wish it were a winter or at least a fall.

What is this site for?

In February I’m planning to start several projects in English:

  • Blog and personal newsletter about writing and design. I love sharing some good thoughts and notions about things and people around me.
  • Shortreads about life in Russia, stories of some Russians that touched me.

Follow this blog via RSS or subscribe to the newsletter so you don’t miss the news and updates.

I’ll finish this post with a quote of my favorite writer Ernest Hemingway.

Life should never daunt you. Never be daunted. It’s the secret of my success. I’ve never been daunted. Never been daunted in public.

Ernest Hemingway, 1899−1961